A Different Muslim

After Blood Brothers was published, I’d often get comments like “I enjoyed the book but I didn’t get why your main character is a Muslim.” It’s a good question, the answer to which is both simple and complex. Here’s the simple part, which has mostly to do with how I write fiction. My characters take on their own lives in my subconscious.  After a while, they act as if it’s their story, not mine.  If that makes no sense to you, it didn’t to me either, but that’s what happens, so I just work with it.  When I’m deep into a novel, as I am now with the sequel to Blood Brothers, I go to bed at night while my characters are busy getting into mischief — or worse. I wake up, and there they are, all excited to tell me what they’ve experienced while I was asleep. I first became aware of my main character Henry Doyle when he was a 10 year old boy, sitting high up in a huge oak tree, looking at the British officers and Iroquois chiefs in front of Johnson Hall in the Mohawk Valley in 1770, wondering who his father might be. The bastard son of a white woman and Sir William Johnson,  the British superintendent for Indian Affairs in New York,  Henry was raised by the Mohawks as a  warrior fighting against the American “Rebels”  in an unsuccessful attempt to keep white settlers from stealing the rich Mohawk homeland in New York during the Revolution. Having both terrified and pissed off the Americans, Henry left America when Britain lost the war to...