Canada to Close Its Borders on January 21 to American Political Refugees

Canada to Close Its Borders on January 21 to American Political Refugees

Alert to readers:  Please see note at end.   As a summertime Canadian resident at our vacation home in Nova Scotia, I check out the Globe and Mail after I return to New Jersey, and this story by Globe and Mail reporter Isaac Bickerstaff caught my attention. He cites reputable sources who report on private conversations being held among Canadian Parliamentary leaders. “We Canadians have always looked up to America,” Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau is reported to have said. “Actually,  it’s probably been a lot more like envy.  But as we see Mr. Trump  in action as the president elect, it’s turning to genuine alarm. For people less polite than we Canadians, the proper response might even be disgust.” “Mr. Trump has already established a bizarre approach to dealing with leaders of foreign governments.  He treats us as if we were  potential contestants for “the Apprentice.” I got a call from him at supper time a few days ago. Strange as it was, I took the call. I decided to end it when Mr. Trump suggested that America should just buy Canada in order to get our oil.  The next day, he tweeted this response. “Of course, Mr. Trump is buddy buddy with some foreign leaders, such as Vladimir Putin.  Actually he, and his Secretary of State choice, Exxon Mobil Corp Chief Executive Officer Rex Tillerson, will make a bundle from cozying up to Russia. Mr. Trump’s answer, ‘I like people who made a fortune.’  “When one looks at how you Americans elect presidents, perhaps it explains the strange people you wind up with: you spend several years and...

Real Problems Need Real Solutions

It is profoundly disturbing as we near the end of an interminable, disgustingly ugly, and shamefully expensive presidential election that the issues  dominating the debate center on Donald Trump’s and Bill Clinton’s sexual misconduct. We actually face serious challenges in this country, many of which are complexly interlinked, so that action to solve one set of problems can trigger potentially unanticipated negative consequences for other problems.  Challenges we aren’t talking about, listening to, or attempting to address: The technology-driven global economy has dramatically and irreversibly changed everything: markets, the application of economic theory, the nature of competition, and the meaning of productive work. It’s as profound a seismic shift as the rise of an automobile-dominated society in the early 1900s, the growth of the industrial age in the 1700’s, or the discovery of the new world in the 1500’s. What we should be talking about is how do we as a nation, invest in educational resources in order to ensure that American workers are the most efficient, productive workforce in the world, with the skills to compete in the new industries and markets emerging in this new global economy. Global warming is real (sorry Koch brothers and Exxon/Mobil). Its consequences – some of which we’re experiencing now, some of which we can reasonably anticipate – threaten our financial stability and the quality of life of millions of Americans. Human beings contribute to the problem. That means human beings can also act to mitigate the problem.  But we can’t do that if a large portion of elected officials refuse to even acknowledge the problem exists and needs a solution. We...