Dead Towns of Newfoundland

In July 2014, I joined my brother Pete, his friend Gene Carlson, captain of Exit, a Passoa 46, built by Garcia in Normandy, and crew member Tom Mann, on a cruise from Nova Scotia along the south coast of Newfoundland. We poked into the rapidly disappearing outports on our way, starting with Grand Bruit. The 2008 Cruising Guide to Newfoundland had promised a wonderful experience of a departing way of life. Grand Bruit is a quaint isolated fishing community only accessible by boat. The name “Grand Bruit,” no doubt French, means “great noise” as is apparent by the roar of the falls which can be heard from a great distance. The community is situated on the shores of a well protected harbour with sloping hills and a waterfall that makes a path through the centre of the village. A visit to this picturesque fishing village will take you on a path that is dotted with brightly colored houses, providing an opportunity to meet with the friendly people of Grand Bruit. Because of its safe and interesting location, the Grand Bruit harbour has become a popular resting point for visitors to the area by way of pleasure crafts. Natural and traditionally Newfoundland, the settlement of Grand Bruit remains among the now few isolated fishing communities on the island. It offers a truly unique experience that is filled with the rich culture and heritage of outport Newfoundland. We were looking forward to meeting people and enjoying a home-cooked meals at the “Cramalot Inn.” The Go Western Newfoundland Brochure declared “the annual population of about 30 residents more than doubles during July...